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Engineering Non-immune Cells to Kill Cancer Cells

But researchers have recently used T-cells engineered in the laboratory to combat tumours. Modified to include additional functions, these immune cells can hunt down and kill cancer cells. Unfortunately, however, such immune cell therapies can have significant side-effects. On top of that, the production of modified T-cells is technically challenging.

Single Cell Diagnostics for Breast Cancer

"Breast tumors are moving targets because they are really versatile," says Jun-Lin Guan, Francis Brunning Professor and Chair of the Department of Cancer at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and member of the Cincinnati Cancer Center and UC Cancer Institute, who co-authored the paper with postdoctoral fellow Syn

Zinc Can Halt the Growth of Cancer Cells, study Says

Previous studies had shown that zinc is essential for maintaining human health and protects the esophagus from cancer. However, it has never been fully understood why zinc has the ability to prevent cancer in the esophagus. In this study, a team led by Zui Pan, an associate professor of nursing

Melanoma Cells Rewire to Resist Drug Treatment

A study out this week in Nature, led by scientists from the University of Pennsylvania and The Wistar Institute, reveals why these relapses occur. While the combination therapies block off the principal pathway that cancer cells use to fuel their growth, the cells come to bypass this blockade and, like vehicles

Mitochondria Drive Cell Survival in Times of Need

The research, published in Molecular Cell, builds on previous work by McGill professor Nahum Sonenberg, one of the senior authors of the new study. Cells in our body grow in size, mass and numbers through a process governed by a master regulator known as mTOR (Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin). Sonenberg discovered years

Human Skin Cells Transformed Directly Into Motor Neurons

In new research, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have converted skin cells from healthy adults directly into motor neurons without going through a stem cell state. The technique makes it possible to study motor neurons of the human central nervous system in the lab. Unlike commonly

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