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Uncovering the Power of Glial Cells

The collaboration was led by Erin Purcell, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Michigan State University; Joseph W. Salatino, Purcell's graduate student researcher; Kip A. Ludwig, associate director of technology at Mayo Clinic; and Takashi Kozai, assistant professor of bioengineering at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering. "Glial cells

Fighting Myocardial Infarction with Nanoparticle Tandems

In a heart attack, clots usually lead to persistent circulatory problems in parts of the heart muscle, which then cause heart muscle cells to die. Attempts have been made for some time to revitalize the damaged heart tissue with replacement cells. "However, most of the cells are pushed out of

Prototype UT Equipment can Detect Rheumatoid Arthritis

Several years ago, researchers from the University of Twente joined forces with a number of companies to develop a prototype for a machine that would combine ultrasound and photoacoustics medical imaging techniques. Combining these techniques allows specialists to create images of superficial areas of the body that can offer doctors

Squirtable Elastic Surgical Glue Seals Wounds in 60 Seconds

Biomedical engineers from the University of Sydney and the United States collaborated on the development of the potentially life-saving surgical glue, called MeTro. MeTro's high elasticity makes it ideal for sealing wounds in body tissues that continually expand and relax -- such as lungs, hearts and arteries -- that are otherwise

Prototype Separates Components of Blood for Diagnostics

The system is optimized to sort out "exosomes," biological nanoparticles released from every type of cell in the body. Thought to play a large role in cell-to-cell communication and disease transmission, they have been objects of scientific curiosity since their discovery three decades ago. The miniscule size of exosomes, however, makes

A Tiny Device Offers Insights to How Cancer Spreads

What if there were a way to find those early aggressors? How are they different from the rest of the cells? And more importantly: Is there a way to stop them before they spread? These questions drove a team of researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center and Michigan

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