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New Patch Aims to Turn Energy Storing Fats into Energy-Burning Fats

It combines a new way to deliver drugs, via a micro-needle patch, with drugs that are known to turn energy-storing white fat into energy-burning brown fat. This innovative approach developed by scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) reduced weight gain in mice on a high fat diet and

New Structure of Key Protein Holds Clues for Better Drug Design

odies. In addition to Wthrich and Eddy, authors of the study, "Allosteric Coupling of Drug Binding and Intracellular Signaling in the A2a Adenosine Receptor," were Tatiana Didenko and Pawel Stanczak of The Scripps Research Institute; Reto Horst of The Scripps Research Institute and Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development; Zhan-Guo Gao and

Pulmonary Fibrosis Caused by Single Transcription Factor

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is currently an incurable lung disease, in which sufferers lose the ability to absorb adequate oxygen. Although the word 'idiopathic' means that the cause is unknown, the disease primarily affects former and active heavy smokers from the age of 50. An important role in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is

Potential Path to Repair MS-Damaged Nerves

Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune, neurodegenerative disease, characterized by distinct disabilities affecting walking, vision, and cognition, to name a few. MS patients differ markedly from each other regarding which disability affects them the most. Inflammation strips the myelin coating from nerve cell extensions, called axons, and connections at the ends

Bacteria Acquire Resistance From Competitors

The frequent and sometimes careless use of antibiotics leads to an increasingly rapid spread of resistance. Hospitals are a particular hot spot for this. Patients not only introduce a wide variety of pathogens, which may already be resistant but also, due to the use of antibiotics to combat infections, hospitals

Using MRI to Understand Why Some Women Go Into Early Labor

They have developed 3D images of the cervix, the load bearing organ which lies at the base of the womb and stops a developing baby from descending into the birth canal before the due date. Around a quarter of miscarriages during the fourth to sixth month of pregnancy (mid-trimester) occur because

Unifying the Theories of Neural Information Encoding

Digital video cameras have the capability to record in incredible detail, but saving all that data would take up a huge amount of space: how can we compress a video -- that is, remove information -- in such a way that we can't see the difference when it is played

Pain Free Skin Patch Responds to Sugar Levels for Management of type 2 Diabetes

Researchers with NIH's National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) have devised an innovative biochemical formula of mineralized compounds that interacts in the bloodstream to regulate blood sugar for days at a time. In a proof-of-concept study performed with mice, the researchers showed that the biochemically formulated patch of

Rate and Risk of Head Injury in Mixed Martial Arts Remain Unknown

Researchers at St. Michael's Hospital reviewed 18 studies involving 7,587 patients, examining head injuries in MMA fighting published between 1990 and 2016. Of the studies included in the review, published online in the journal Trauma, there was no consistent definition of head injury, concussion or traumatic brain injury, or consistent protocol for

Anti-Virus Protein in Humans may Resist Transmission of HIV-1 Precursor from Chimps

APOBEC3H, or A3H, is one of several anti-viral proteins known as A3s that repress replication of lentiviruses, a genus of viruses that includes HIV-1. HIV-1 originated when chimpanzee strains of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVcpz) spread to humans. However, few studies have explored the effects of human A3s on SIVcpz. In the

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